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List of all undergraduate History courses»

Spring 2022 Courses

  • History 101A-940 & 950 — History of World Civilization I (Dr. Smoot, online; part of Online Degree.) The History of World Civilization I–To Industrialization. (University Core Curriculum) A survey of various civilizations in the world from prehistory to the present with particular attention to non-western cultures.
  • History 101B — History of World Civilization II (Dr. Weeks, MW 11-11:50) History 101B is a survey of World History since about 1500. The course is taught in lectures (face to face) and a discussion section weekly (led by a TA). We’ll cover major events and trends around the world from the “discovery” of the Americas almost to the present days. Required Readings: a textbook + a primary source reader. The textbook provides information about people, events, trends in World History in this period. The primary source reader contains documents that students will analyze and discuss in the discussion sections. For a student to do well in this course, regular attendance at lectures and discussion sections as well as careful reading of both textbook and primary source reader will be necessary. Assignments: Two hour exams + final exam, two short papers, homework and other short writing assignments for section. || HIST 101B-940 & 950, Kemp, online.
  • History 101B-955 — History of World Civilization II (Dr. Cohen, online 3/14/22 to 5/8/22) How do we tell the history of the world since Christopher Columbus? As you will see in this class, there is not one way to answer this question. It depends on how you analyze historical sources: letters, treaties, literature, art, and even film and music. We’ll cover topics that you have studied before, but we will often put them in new contexts. Have you thought about globalization in relation to Mexican pottery? Or, about the legacies of the First World War in relation to jazz and animation? We will in this class! This class is not about memorizing facts, but rather interpreting sources and events. It is built around the idea that history is a puzzle, the most complex one in human existence: it has an infinite number of pieces, many of which are missing, broken, two-sided, or three-dimensional—and it never comes in a box with a picture telling you how it should look. Required Book: Robert Marks, The Origins of the Modern World: A Global and Environmental Narrative from the Fifteenth to the Twenty-First Century (4th edition, 2020). (New: $34.00) Assignments: Quizzes, Online Discussions, Three Short (1-2 Page) Papers, and Final Exam.
  • History 110-950 20th Century America (Dr. Bean, online) This is the fundamental course in American history. It helps students appreciate their national heritage and provides the context to explore intelligently our collective, alternative futures. This course seeks to equip students with an understanding of basic social and political issues such as economic and environmental policy, civil rights and welfare programs, constitutional interpretations and foreign policy, as well as the evolution of competing perspectives--conservative, liberal and radical--on these questions. It provides an informational foundation for the social sciences, and employs their techniques to describe and interpret the past. Required Readings: two online interactive textbooks. Assignments: online discussion, textbook exercises, very short response papers (less than one page).
  • History 112-950 — 20th Century World (Dr. Benti, online) The history of Europe, Asia, Africa and Latin America since 1900. Emphasis on political conflict, economic development, social change and cultural transformation in an increasingly integrated world.
  • History 207-001 — World History: Gender in World History  (Dr. Najar, TR 3:35-5:00) The course explains the changing and multiple distinctions of gender that shaped the lives of women and men from prehistory to the modern period. Gender was central to changing economic systems, the growth of cities and states, conquest, colonialism, and religion, among many other key historical processes. Student will learn how to use social theory and primary sources to challenge persistent assumptions that women have simply kept house and cared for children, a reductive understanding of women in history. Rather, this course will illustrate the role of women’s productive labor as gatherers, farmer, textile wavers both at home and in factories, and in different places as rules of empires and nations. Understanding world history in terms of gender will equip students with a critical understanding of the different meanings of the family, a foundational institution of every societies. Families informed how marriages were contracted and ancestry calculated to how property was transferred and classes formed. The Justinian Code of Laws (534 C.E) prohibited parents or grand-parents from marrying their children! How wide-spread was this practice that a law needed to be enacted? In politics, excluding women from public spaces in classical Athens is relevant to understanding democracy and all its theories. Can the exclusion of women in Athens partially explain why women did not get the right to vote until the 20th century, not only in the United States but also around the world? Required Readings: All reading will be available in D2L, no textbook is required. Assignments: There will be one midterm and one final exam; additionally, there will be weekly assignments related to analyzing primary sources.
  • History 207-950 (Dr. Weeks, online) This is an entirely online survey course of World History, concentrating on the West (i.e., mainly but not exclusively Europe) since ca. 1500. The aim of the course is to acquaint students with major developments in world history since approximately the Reformation, to inform students on how history is written, and to allow students to develop their own writing and analytical skills. To do well, students will have to keep up on textbook readings and activities, participate actively in weekly online discussions, and write several short essays and primary source analyses. Required Readings: one online interactive textbooks. Purchase of this online textbook is required since the online exercises/activities make up a significant portion of the grade. Assignments: online discussion, online textbook exercises, short response papers, primary source analysis.
  • History 207-940 & 953 (Yattani, online class 3/14/22 to 5/8/22). An investigation of select issues in societies of the world from pre-history through the 20th century, with a focus on primary source interpretation. Some sections of this course may be limited to History majors. Please consult with advisor and/or instructor.
  • History 207-943 & 954 (Dr. Sramek, MWF 10-11:50, online as scheduled – 3/14/22 to 5/7/22) (University Core Curriculum course) An investigation of select issues in societies of the world from pre-history through the 20th century, with a focus on primary source interpretation. Some sections of this course may be limited to History majors. Please consult with advisor and/or instructor.
  • History 212-950 — American Studies (Same as ENGL 212) (Dr. Anthony, online) Offers interdisciplinary approach to the study of America and American selfhood, and thus to the central question, "What is an American?". Texts range from novels and films to museums and shopping malls. Issues range from multiculturalism to abstract notions such as citizenship and authenticity.
  • History 300-940 & 950 — Origins of Modern America, 1492–1877 (Dr. Whaley, online; part of Online Degree) This class provides a basic overview of major political, cultural, and economic topics from the initial colonization of North America by western Europeans through the formative years of the United States, 1776 to 1877. This course is readings based and emphasizes comprehension, writing, and interpretation. Students will write chapter assignments using essays and primary documents, two five-page papers, and brief discussion post assignments; all of which are based on chapters from the Cobbs and Blum book below. REQUIRED READING: Cobbs and Blum, Major Problems in American History, vol. 1, 4th ed. All graded assignments are based on Cobbs and Blum. Recommended reading: Free online textbook, The American Yawp, vol 1. Morris Library also has access if you want to obtain a pdf or a hardcopy. The textbook is intended to provide background context to support the Cobbs and Blum collection of essays and documents. No assignments directly draw on the textbook, and that is why I deemed it “recommended” not required. You may use most any standard college U.S. history textbook instead if you already have access to one.
  • History 301-001 — Modern America from 1877 to the Present (Dr. Smoot, MWF 11-11:50) (University Core Curriculum course) [IAI Course: S2 901] A general survey of the political, social and economic development of the United States from 1877 to the present.
  • History 303-001 — Religion in American History (Carter, TR 10-11:15) Topics will vary with instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of nine semester hours, provided registrations cover different topics.
  • History 320-001 — Early Modern Europe (Meets w/PHIL 305B) (Dr. Sramek, MWF 1-1:50) The development of Europe from the Renaissance through the Age of the French Revolution.
  • History 324-950 — Women & Gender History (Dr. Dilley, TR 2-3:15, online as scheduled) (Same as WGSS 348) The 20th Century was a period of rapid transformation for women in the United States. The period between WW II and the Vietnam War, while in many ways stifling for the aspiration and experiences of many women, laid the groundwork for the second wave of feminist activism in the U.S. This readings-based seminar will provide students an overview of the topic, laying the groundwork for potential further study in the history of women and the history of the U.S. The readings combine multiple areas, including women in (and represented in) mass media, popular culture, and American literature; women in higher education in the U.S.; women’s expanded abilities to travel, to live independ-ently, and to have careers; along with women’s general, lived experiences in mid-century. The reading load is about 80 pages per class session.
  • History 340-001 — History of the Cold War (Dr. Benti, TR 9:35-10:50) This course is designed to acquaint students with the themes, events and figures prominent in the Cold War era. The origins of the Cold War and the global ramifications of sustained tension among the rival powers will be discussed. The events and the people within the context of their times will be evaluated.
  • History 362B-001 — Black American History Since 1865 (Same as AFR 311B) (Dr. Cohen, MWF 10-10:50) -- How have African Americans tried to create a more inclusive and socially just United States? As we explore the history of African Americans after the Civil War, we will examine the many ways African American intellectuals, artists, and activists have demanded equality and asserted their humanity. We will focus on the cultural and political debates African Americans have had about racial integration, Black cultural expressions, and racial protests. You’ll even get the chance to put yourself in their shoes and have debates as the African Americans we study! Required Books: Jonathan Scott Holloway, The Cause of Freedom: A Concise History of African Americans (2021). (New: $18.95) Julie Buckner Armstrong and Amy Schmidt, eds., The Civil Rights Reader: American Literature from Jim Crow to Reconciliation (2009). (New: $26.95) Assignments: Papers, Participation, In-Class Debates/Role Playing.

  • History 370A-001 & 980 — History of Latin America-Colonial (Dr. Najar, MW 2-3:15) This course will introduce students to the history of colonial Latin America as well as critical issues in the study of Latin American. Together, we will analyze the cultural groups, identities, and interests that came together in the “New World” which subsequently formed the basis for the societies of Latin America. The “Columbian Exchange” brought new food sources to the Old World, which resulted in increasing its population; unfortunately it also brought deadly diseases to the New World’s indigenous people. The class illustrates Iberian’s political and military domination in the fifteenth century, which opened Western eyes to new wealth, power, and knowledge possibilities. This course explores major themes from the 1500s through the early 19th century; gender and sexuality; race and ethnicity; slavery and Indian resistance. It also aims to define early Latin America from both local and world perspectives heading into the late eighteenth century and the age of the Atlantic Revolutions and Latin American independence. Required Readings: Mark A Burkholder and Lyman L. Johnson, Colonial Latin America, 9th ed. (2012); Inga Clendinnen, Ambivalent Conquests: Maya and Spaniard in Yucatán, 1517-1570, 2nd ed. (2003); James H. Sweet, Recreating Africa: Culture, Kinship, and Religion in the African-Portuguese World, 1441-1770 (2003).

  • History 392-001 — Historical Research and Writing (Dr. Bean, TR 11-12:15) History 392 introduces you to the tools and methods which historians use to research and write history. Since this is a seminar, you will take a more active role in this course than in many of your other courses. Come to class ready to discuss assigned readings and critique the written and oral work of your fellow students. The course is divided into three segments. First, we begin by discussing methods of historical research and writing: selecting a topic, using the library, evaluating evidence, and writing a research paper. Second, you will spend several weeks engaged in independent research and writing. Finally, you will make an oral and written presentation of your research findings. Your final paper will incorporate the revisions suggested by your colleagues and instructor. Required readings: Rampolla, Pocket Guide to Writing in History (2017 or later edition — older is cheaper). Assignments: weekly one-on-one meetings with instructor, library and other exercises, participate in class discussions; book review; oral presentations, and final paper 10-12 pages long.
  • HISTORY 392-940 (Dr. Sramek, online, part of Online Degree) History 392 introduces you to the tools and methods which historians use to research and write history. Since this is a seminar, you will take a more active role in this course than in many of your other courses. Come to class ready to discuss assigned readings and critique the written and oral work of your fellow students. The course is divided into three segments. First, we begin by discussing methods of historical research and writing: selecting a topic, using the library, evaluating evidence, and writing a research paper. Second, you will spend several weeks engaged in independent research and writing. Finally, you will make an oral and written presentation of your research findings. Your final paper will incorporate the revisions suggested by your colleagues and instructor. Required readings: Rampolla, Pocket Guide to Writing in History (2017 or later edition — older is cheaper). Assignments: weekly one-on-one meetings with instructor, library and other exercises, participate in class discussions; book review; oral presentations, and final paper 10-12 pages long.

  • History 403 — American Indians & U.S. Empire (Dr. Whaley, M 1-3:30) Use historical analysis to tackle thorny issues involving American Indians and the U.S. government in the 20th century. Examples include tribal sovereignty (vis-à-vis the federal and state governments,) identity (individual and tribal,) environment and energy, civil rights, child welfare, religion, and land claims. As a class, students will read three books (a broad overview, a collection of essays, and a collection of documents) with corresponding weekly assignments (short papers and an exam.) In the latter weeks of the semester, students will work on individual projects with my assistance, which include further readings on a chosen topic, individual meetings with me, a final paper (10-12 pages,) and a brief oral presentation to the class. REQUIRED READING: Iverson and Davies, “We Are Still Here”: American Indians since 1890, 2nd ed.; Cobb, “Say We are Nations”: Documents of Politics and Protest; Cobb and Fowler, Beyond Red Power: American Indian Politics and Activism; Additional readings for individual projects assigned or approved by instructor. Attendance is mandatory and it will be taken every time the class meets. Students have to complete all assignments to get a grade.

  • History 426-001 — Cities and Cultures in Europe 1870–1914 (Dr. Weeks, M 2-4:30) History 426 is a reading-intensive course looking at the intersection of culture and urban development in the two generations before World War I. The course will require an average of 200 pages of reading weekly, sometimes more. Each week we will meet in seminar fashion and discuss these readings, so careful reading and preparation is crucial for the success of the course. At the end of the course, students should have a greater appreciation of Paris, Berlin, Vienna, and St. Petersburg in these decades from a social, cultural, and political point of view. Required Readings: There is no textbook for this course. There are instead a number of books and articles that cover various aspects of urban/cultural history in this period. Students must count on at least 200 pages of reading weekly. Assignments: Weekly discussion is required and graded. There are no exams in this course but instead three pages of around 800-1000 words each discussing the readings and their historical context. Students are expected to be capable of writing on a university level or, failing that, to seek help at the Writing Centers on campus. To do well in this course, students must read carefully, think about the readings, participate actively in discussions, and demonstrate their understanding of the sources covered in well-written papers.

  • History 487-001 — Civil Rights Movement (Same as AFR 497) (Dr. Cohen, MW 2-3:15) Civil Rights activist and scholar Julian Bond said that too many Americans describe the Civil Rights Movement as the following: “Rosa sat down. Martin stood up. And then the white folks saw the light and saved the day.” In this class, you’ll get to explore why these three sentences are not sufficient to understand the Civil Rights Movement. And, we will investigate why the American public has too often been taught such a simple and incorrect history. This discussion-based seminar will ask you to think about how everyone in the US should understand the Civil Rights Movement, and as we do this, we’ll keep a sharp eye on how racial politics today feed off of these myths about what was—and was not—the Civil Rights Movement. In this class, you will also have the chance to use the Katherine Dunham Papers at Morris Library. This means that you’ll get to see and use documents from the Civil Rights Movement! Required Books: Peniel E. Joseph, The Sword and the Shield: The Revolutionary Lives of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King Jr. (2020). (New: $18.99) Jeanne Theoharis, A More Beautiful and Terrible History: The Uses and Misuses of Civil Rights History (2018). (New: $18.00) Nikhil Pal Singh, Black Is a Country: Race and the Unfinished Struggle for Democracy (2004). (New: $29.50) Assignments: In-Class Participation and Papers.

  • History 493-001 — Topics: Black Lives Matter (Dr. Smoot, MWF 1-1:50) Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for a maximum of six semester hours provided registrations cover different topics. Topics announced in advance.

  • History 493-940 & 952 — Topics: Modern Turkey (Dr. Yilmaz, online; part of Online Degree) This course examines the history of modern Turkey from the end of the Ottoman Empire and the foundation of the Republic in 1923 to the present. The goal is to introduce students to the major social, political, cultural, and economic events and issues in Republican Turkey. The course is organized around major turning points such as World War One, the foundation of the republic, emergence of the single party regime, transition to a multi-party system, the 1960 and 1980 military coups, and return to democratization in 1983. Secular modernization and the republican reforms; the major social, cultural, and economic transformations; political democratization; foreign policy; and ethnic, religious and class challenges to the republican ideology are the main themes we will discuss. Not open to freshmen.

Major Requirements

A major in history consists of thirty-six semester hours of history courses. Normally course selection should represent three areas of history (United States history, European history, and either Asian, African or Latin American history) and be distributed chronologically as well as geographically. A minor in history is eighteen hours.

Students must also complete a minimum of four courses at the 400 level and they must write a research paper in history. The paper is completed in History 392. A grade of "C" or better is required in History 392. HIST 392 papers meet the College of Liberal Arts Writing-Across-the-Curriculum (WAC) requirement.