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Cross-Appointed Faculty

Kristen Barber

Assistant Professor, Sociology

Kristen Barber

618-453-2494
barber@siu.edu

Dr. Barber received her Ph.D. from University of Southern California and joined the SIU Sociology faculty in 2011. Having lived in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina, she has a unique perspective in the area of disaster research, and focuses particularly on methodological issues affecting local researchers, who themselves live through disaster. She has received writing awards from the Pacific Sociological Association and the Mid-South Sociological Association, and is currently a council member for the Body and Embodiment section of the American Sociological Association.


Lisa Brooten

Associate Professor, Radio, Television and Digital Media

Lisa Brooten holds a Ph.D. in international telecommunications and an MAIA in international development studies from Ohio University. After years working in community radio in Philadelphia and a professional stint in radio production with the show "Fresh Air with Terry Gross" distributed by National Public Radio, she spent nearly seven years living and working in Southeast Asia, both in rural areas home to refugees and in cosmopolitan cities. After this, she began formal research on the media of the region. Her work has focused especially on Burmese independent media in opposition to the country's military dictatorship, and on Southeast Asian regional media reform efforts; on media representations of gender and race; on human rights and the militarization of everyday culture; and more generally on alternative media and social movements.


Cade Bursell

Associate Professor, Cinema and Photography

Cade Bursell

618-453-2365
cbursell@siu.edu

Cade Bursell’s creative work engages both experimental processes and a socially engaged media arts practice with a focus on human rights and environmental issues, and grounded in an understanding of the relationship between medium and meaning. Her interests include queer studies, women’s studies, environmental and animal studies and Buddhist philosophy. Her creative practice is guided by a set of ethical principles that involves a deep regard, concern and recognition of the complex interdependence of all forms of life.

Her most recent film Salt Lines, received a Director's Choice award from Black Maria Film Festival and screened at Chicago Underground Film Festival, Berlin International Director's Lounge, Crystal Palace Experimental Film Festival and Experiments in Cinema V 8.5 - Collaborating with Nature and has been invited to screen this summer at Another Experiment by Women Festival - the New Filmmakers Women’s Night at Anthology Film Archives.


Jennida Chase

Assistant Professor, Cinema and Photography

Jennida Chase

COMM 1121F

chasej@siu.edu

Jennida Chase is a multi-media artist who primarily works with film, video and sound. Themes within her work deal with relational interaction played out in society at large. She regularly collaborates, exhibits and performs with S/N. Accessibility plays a key role in S/N’s work. In the past few years they have been creating mobile platform public interventions. Her work has been extensively shown in galleries, museums, art fairs and film/video festivals internationally such as The Hong Kong International Art Fair, Pekin Fine Art, The Freies Museum Berlin.


Kathleen Chwalisz-Rigney

Professor, Psychology

Kathleen Chwalisz-Rigney

Life Science II 208E
(618) 453-3541
chwalisz@siu.edu

CV (PDF)

Dr. Chwalisz’s research interests involve health psychology and integrated health care, rehabilitation psychology, family caregiving, training of psychologists, multicultural mentoring, psychotherapy science, qualitative methodology, and structural equation modeling. She has edited a book on rural caregiving and has numerous chapters in professional books in counseling psychology, health psychology, and rehabilitation psychology. She has served as Chair of the Council of Counseling Psychology Training Programs, and she has been Chair of the Society of Counseling Psychology’s Section for the Promotion of Psychotherapy Science and Section for Counseling Health Psychology. Her research articles have appeared in the Journal of Counseling Psychology, The Counseling Psychologist, Rehabilitation Psychology, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, and Journal of Psychology in Medical Settings. She has served on several Journal editorial boards, and she is currently an Associate Editor for the Journal of Clinical Psychology. She was principal investigator on the SIU Rural Caregiver Telehealth Intervention Trial, a community-based intervention trial sponsored by the National Institute of Aging and the National Institute of Nursing Research. Teaching and clinical interests are in supervision, conceptualization and treatment planning, psychological assessment, and evidence-based practice/empirically supported treatment. Dr. Chwalisz is a Fellow of Division 17 (Society of Counseling Psychology) and Division 22 (Rehabilitation Psychology) of the American Psychological Association.


Bryan Kelso Crow

Associate Professor, Communication Studies

Bryan Kelso Crow

Bryan Crow holds a Ph.D. in Communication and Theatre Arts from the University of Iowa (1982) and has been teaching at SIU since 1981. He regularly teaches CMST/WGSS 415: Gender, Sexuality and Communication. His research and teaching interests include film studies, interpersonal and family communication, conversation analysis, and language, culture, and communication. He hosts Celtic Connections on WSIU Radio, and is affiliated with the Irish Studies faculty at SIU. He is also cross-appointed with the Department of Linguistics.


Suzanne Daughton

Associate Professor, Communication Studies

Suzanne Daughton

618-453-2291
daughton@siu.edu

Associate Professor, Ph.D., University of Texas, 1991. Rhetorical theory and criticism, political communication, sexuality and gender, metaphor and narrative rhetorical discourse.


Aaron J. Diehr

Assistant Professor, Health Education and Recreation

Aaron Dier

Aaron J Diehr is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Health Education and Recreation.  He holds a PhD in health education from the University of Toledo, along with an MA in English literature from DePaul University and a BA in English from the Ohio State University.  His research is focused on racial and ethnic health disparities and sexual health disparities, with particular interest in dual- or multi-marginalized individuals and groups.  Aaron teaches sexuality-related courses in the Department of Health Education and Recreation, including HED 410 (Human Sexuality) and HED 414 (Sexuality Education).  In his spare time, Aaron enjoys reading, traveling, drinking coffee, and watching college football (though not all at once).


Patrick Dilley

Associate Professor, Women’s Studies and Higher Education and Qualitative Research

Patrick Dilley

618-536-4434
pdilleyphd@me.com

Dr. Dilley is the recipient of multiple awards, including:

  • Annuit Coeptis Award, American College Personnel Association, 2004
  • Research Recognition Award, Standing Committee for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Awareness, American College Personnel Association, 2004.
  • Emerging Scholar Award, American College Personnel Association, 2002

He authored "Queer man on campus: A history of non-heterosexual college men, 1945-2000," as well as multiple articles, chapters and other publications.


Jane Dougherty

Associate Professor, English

Jane Dougherty

618-453-5321
dohugany@siu.edu

Jane Elizabeth Dougherty is an Assoicate Professor specializing in Irish literature of the eighteenth, nineteenth and twentieth centuries.  Her scholarship focuses on the social and political master narratives of Irish history and the ways in which these narratives enable and disable the production, form style and reception of Irish literary narratives.  The author of articles on Anthony Trollope, Nuala O'Faolain and Edna O'Brien, she is currently working on a book project, Joyce's sisters: National Maturation and Contemporary Irish Women Writers, and is developing/teaching courses on Irish and modern British literature, literary analysis, vampires, and the Harry Potter series.  Dr. Dougherty has held fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Keough-Notre Dame Centre, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Midwest Modern Language Association and the Newberry Library and the National University of Ireland-Galway.  She regularly teaches Introduction to Literary Analysis and the second half of the Irish Literature Survey, as well as, offering seminars on Irish women writers, Irish maturation narratives, Irish film, and Ireland in theory.


Laura Dreuth Zeman

Professor, School of Social Work

618-453-2243
dreuth@siu.edu

Laura Dreuth Zeman is a Professor of Social Work and Women Studies at Southern Illinois University in Carbondale where she has taught since 1998. She integrates practice and research at the point it where they intersect with the consumer. Her understanding of families and trauma grew out of extensive research and by her experiences working as a therapist in psychiatric hospitals, residential programs, and in private practice. Her clinical practice specialized in mental illness, addiction, and family care with an emphasis on supporting the recovery of survivors of sexual abuse. She has published over 30 papers as articles in professional and peer-reviewed journals and as chapters in books. She has presented numerous research papers in national and international venues. Her current research involves examining parenting children with autism spectrum disorders and developmental disabilities from the participants’ perspective and school safety.


James Ferraro

Associate Professor, Physiology

James Ferraro

618-453-1593
jferraro@siumed.edu

Dr. Ferraro's research interests and past work includes circadian rhythms, space physiology, reproductive function and sexual behavior.


Laurel Fredrickson

Assistant Professor, School of Art and Design

Laurel Fredrickson

618-453-4315
lfredrickson@siu.edu

Laurel Fredrickson (Ph.D., Duke, 2007) is a historian of contemporary and modern art with a global emphasis. Her interdisciplinary research focuses on cross-cultural and transnational intersections of experimental art and political dissent from the 1960s to the present. She is currently revising her book Désire/Délire/Désordre: Jean-Jacques Lebel's Erotic Revolution to send to a press. This is the first book-length study of the anticolonial and anti-institutional art and politics of an icon of revolution in the 1960s who as an artist, played a translational role: circulating theories and strategies across generational and disciplinary boundaries to connect cultural and political avant-gardes internationally. At present she is completing the first book-length study of the anticolonial art and politics of Jean-Jacques Lebel (1936, France), an artist who interconnected political and artistic avant-gardes internationally and bridged the historical and postwar avant-gardes. 

She has also begun preliminary research for another book, Deterritorialized Identity: Transnational Women Artists and French Colonialism. This project explores the art of women who interrogate the postmodern condition of deterritorialized identity through video, installation, and performance, including those in my case studies Zenib Sedira (b. 1963, France), Miriam Mihindou (b. 1964, Gabon), and Latifa Echakhch (b. 1974, Morocco). The work of each artist visualizes intersections of present-day and historical political realities and traumatic memory in the mediated materiality of embodiment and dissent, and each uniquely expresses a body-politics shaped by displacement, refugee status, and the frontier as site of obstruction and passage.


Laura Halliday

Senior Lecturer

Education: Ph.D., Southern Illinois University at Carbondale.
Interests: TESOL theory and methods, ESL writing, pedagogical grammar.


Frances Harackiewicz

Professor, Electrical and Computer Engineering

Frances Harackiewicz

Engineering E-120

618-453-7031

fran@engr.siu.edu

Dr. Harackiewicz's research interests are in: (a) Electromagnetics, (b) antenna theory and design, (c) microwaves, (d) microstrip phased arrays and anisotropic materials, (e) small multiband and broadband antennas, (f) PIFAs, (g) loops, (h) printed and dielectric antennas.


Jacob Haubenreich

Assistant Professor, German

Jacob Haubenreich

Faner 2021

618-453-5429

haubenreich@siu.edu

Jacob Haubenreich received his Ph.D. in 2013 from the University of California, Berkeley. His research focuses on the the materiality and mediality of writing and reading, theories of authorship, visuality and textuality, hermeneutics and posthermeneutics, and new materialism(s). Broader interests include 19th-21st century German literature and philosophy, media history/theory, multilingualism, literary theory, philosophy of language, semiotics, and narrative theory. He has presented and published research on topics ranging from the scenes of writing, editing, and reading among writers such as Rainer Maria Rilke, Thomas Bernhard, and Peter Handke, to the narrative collapse of reality in E.T.A. Hoffmann's Rat Krespel (1818), to the medial construction of the reader in Sebastian Brant's Ship of Fools (1494).


Holly Hurlburt

Associate Professor, History

Holly Hurlburt

618-453-4391
hurlburt@siu.edu

Dr. Holly Hurlburt earned her Ph.D. from Syracuse University in 2000 and came to SIU in the same year.  She teaches western civilization and world history as well as courses in early modern Europe, and women, family, gender and sexuality.  Her research focuses on women, gender and political power in late medieval and early Modern Italy. 

Palgrave Macmillan press published her book, The Dogaressa of Venice: Wife and Icon in 2006, and she spent 2007-08 at Villa I Tatti, Harvard University's Center for Renaissance Studies in Florence, Italy, working on her second project, the focus of which is gender in the Venetian overseas empire.


Maria Johnson

Associate Professor, School of Music

Maria Johnson

618-453-2073
mariavj@siu.edu

Maria Johnson is Associate Professor of Ethnomusicology in the School of Music at Southern Illinois University, Carbondale where she regularly teaches two CORE Curriculum courses-- Music 203 - Diversity & Popular Music in American Culture and Music 303I - Women, Blues & Literature, offers topics courses in Ethnomusicology-- Women in Music and Music and Social Change, and supervises graduate and undergraduate independent studies in ethnomusicology. On sabbatical Fall 2005, Johnson is working on a book entitled Kickin' Ass and Takin' Names: Saffire and the Tradition of Uppity Women's Blues.

Raised in central Massachusetts, Johnson earned degrees in music from The Colorado College (B.A., Magna cum Laude) and The University of California at Berkeley (M.A., Ph.D. in ethnomusicology), and was awarded an Irvine Foundation Postdoctoral Teaching Fellowship at Stanford University from 1993-1995. Prior to her arrival at SIUC in 1997, she taught at Stanford University, The Colorado College, and The University of California at Berkeley.

Johnson's articles on women's blues and interdisciplinary scholarship on African American women's literature as performance appear in African American Review, Arkansas Review: A Journal of Delta Studies, Women and Music: A Journal of Gender and Culture, Frontiers: A Journal of Women Studies, Black Orpheus: Music in African American Fiction From the Harlem Renaissance to Toni Morrison (Garland, 2000), and More than the Blues: Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Black Women and Music (University of Illinois Press, 2005), She has also contributed essays to Notable American Women: A Biographical Dictionary (Harvard, 2004), The Encyclopedia of the Blues (Routledge, 2005), and the Encyclopedia of African American Folklore (Greenwood, 2005). She presents regularly at the annual meetings of The Society for Ethnomusicology, The U.S. Branch of The International Association for the Study of Popular Music, The Delta Blues Symposium, and at the bi-annual Feminist Theory & Music conferences. Other notable presentation venues include The International Conference on the Blues Tradition: Memory, Criticism & Pedagogy (State College, PA), Conference on America's Blues Culture and Heritage (Jacksonville, FL), The Zora Neale Hurston Festival of the Arts & Humanities (Orlando, FL), The Scripps College Inaguural Symposium on Women and Music (Claremont, CA), The 1998 International Conference on Bob Dylan (Palo Alto, CA), Music, Sexuality, and Performance Symposium (Berkeley, CA), and Language and Culture: East and West (Manoa, Hawaii).

A blues performer, Johnson is a member of the all-female quintet, Loose Gravel (piano/keyboards, guitar, vocals). In addition to performing regularly at campus functions and community events including "Celebrating Women in the Arts," "Women of Distinction," "Arts in Celebration," "Brown Bag Concerts," "Take Back the Night" and Women's Center Benefits, Loose Gravel was featured at The Delta Blues Symposium VI: Women in the Delta (Jonesboro, AR), The Southern Illinois Women's Health Conference, and at The 25th Annual John A. Logan College High School Writing Competition. The band released a self-produced self-titled compact disc of original recordings in 2003.

Johnson's professional service to the Society for Ethnomusicology includes co-chairing the Section on the Status of Women (2002-2004) and co-chairing The Gender & Sexualities Taskforce (1999-2003).


Jacob Juntunen

Associate Professor, Theater

Jacob Juntunen

618-453-5741 

jjuntunen@siu.edu 

Jacob Juntunen is an Associate Professor in the Department of Theater and in the Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies Program at SIU. His scholarship concentrating on the politics of performance has appeared in Theatre Journal, Puppetry International, Polish-AngloSaxon Studies, the LMDA Review and several anthologies. His research has been supported by Fulbright Fellowship, Thesaurus Poloniae Senior Scholar Fellowship, and a SEED Grant. Dr. Juntunen has extensive experience in the Chicago theatre scene as a playwright and dramaturg, and as a recipient of several grants from the Illinois Arts Council and the Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs. He studied at the Interdisciplinary Program in Theatre and Drama at Northwestern University (PhD), the Professional Playwriting Program at Ohio University (MA), Reed College (BA), and Clackamas Community College (AA).

Dr. Juntunen’s work focuses on people who struggle against society’s boundaries. His first book, Mainstream AIDS Theatre, the Media, and Gay Civil Rights: Making the Radical Palatable, examines the interactions between mainstream AIDS theatre and the media in the late 20th century. His second project expands his geographic scope to examine artistic resistance to the genocidal discourses of the Nazi and Soviet regimes. His playwriting stems from a mix of scholarship and social responsibility. Both focus on understanding the political function of theatre, and this focus is demonstrated in his plays, which, overall, are meant for those “who want to leave the theatre changed and moved,” as one Chicago critic described. He recently wrote See Him? to participate in the Belarusian Dream Theater, a consortium of 18 theaters in 13 countries simultaneously producing plays to raise awareness about human rights violations in Belarus. His play In the Shadow of his Language has enjoyed two staged readings in Chicago, another at Atlanta’s Alliance Theatre, and a workshop off-Broadway. His play Saddam’s Lions—published in Plays for Two (Vintage)—examines the disquieting memories of an African-American female Iraq War veteran and her struggles to come to terms with war-time trauma. Dr. Juntunen based this play on interviews with a veteran. This process combined his desire for politically relevant work, his dedication to diverse casting opportunities, and his scholarship about the politics of performance. He hopes to inspire in students a similar yearning for intellectual curiosity, social activism, and collaboration.


Elaine Jurkowski

Professor, School of Social Work

Elaine Jurkowski

618-453-2243
etjurkow@siu.edu

Dr. Jurkowski was previously an Assistant Professor at the University of Windsor, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. She has held administrative and research positions for The Illinois Public Health Leadership Institute at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Dr. Jurkowski began her social work career working with people who have cognitive and developmental disabilities and supporting these people to develop community social, recreation and leisure skills. Her philosophy of "community integration" and "citizen participation" evolved into vocational and residential settings, and included case management and administrative positions in vocational rehabilitation, and residential settings, serving people with disabilities for the Department of Health and Family Services, Province of Manitoba. Dr. Jurkowski was a "Great Cities" Research Fellow in Health and examined strategies for community needs assessment in the United States and Canada, using citizen participation and traditional needs assessments. She has also served as a program evaluation consultant in a range of public and private settings in developed and developing contexts to include countries such as Canada, the United States, India, Niger and Hong Kong.


Bobbi Knapp

Assistant Professor, Kinesiology

Bobbi Knapp

618-536-2431
bknapp@siu.edu

Dr. Knapp's research interests include the use of sport in the creation of collective memories after tragedies strike, quality of life issues for intercollegiate athletes, gendering of sport injuries, and the dynamics of gender and sexuality in sport.  Her recent research concentrates on women's professional football.  Dr. Knapp spent one year playing professional football and has spent over four years conducting research on varies issues concerning women who play football.


Michele Leigh

Assistant Professor, Cinema & Photography

Michele Leigh

618-453-2365

mleigh@siu.edu 

Michele Leigh is Assistant Professor of Film and Media History in Cinema and Photography, in the college of Mass Communication and Media Arts. Leigh is co-chair for Women in Screen History, a scholarly interest group within the Society for Cinema and Media Studies, where she also is a faculty mentor for the Women's Caucus. She is Co-Executive Secretary for the organization, Women in Film History International. She has published work in Researching Women in Silent Cinema and Screen Culture:  History and Textuality and has publications  forthcoming  in Doing Women's Film History, Women Film Pioneers Project and the Encyclopedia of Women Screenwriters.

My academic career has centered around issues of women, gender and sexuality in film and television. In my dissertation I explored the representation of women in the pre-Revolutionary cinema of Russian director Evgenii Bauer, arguing that Bauer's films function in a proto-feminist context. I am currently researching material for a book on female industrial practice in Russian cinema prior to the Revolution, this project will expand current histories of Russian cinema to acknowledge the contributions of female filmmakers. In addition to this work, I am also developing research on constructions of gender and sexuality in contemporary television. My work on Doctor Who, explores the significance of the female companions in relation to concepts of post-feminism  and  female  fans. I am also working on the construction of race, masculinity, and sexuality in animated television intended for adults, using the show Archer as a case study.  I use my study of gender and sexuality to inform and connect all of my research, which in turn shapes my teaching.


Sarah Lewison

Associate Professor, Radio, Television, and Digital Media

Sarah Lewison

Comm 1050E

slewison@siu.edu

Website:  carbonfarm.us

Associate Professor Sarah Lewison is a media producer, artist, and writer whose work examines power, economics and political subjectivity. Her teaching and research areas include media and social change, ecological pedagogy and experimental performance. Her video work includes the documentary Fat of the Land which screened on PBS and in museums, festivals and community spaces worldwide, and is nationally noted for stimulating the do-it-yourself waste-grease bio-diesel movement. Prof. Lewison's writing about media aesthetics, social history, sustainability and culture has been published in Tema (Denmark), Journal of Northeast Studies (Hamburg, Germany), Area (Chicago), and "Failure! Experiments in Aesthetics and Social Practices" (Aesthetics and Protest Pub., LA). She holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from University of California San Diego.


Chris Mullins

Associate Professor, Department of Criminology & Criminal Justice

Chris Mullins

618-453-5701
mullinsc@siu.edu

Dr. Mullins joined the faculty of SIU in the Fall of 2008. His research focuses on structural and cultural aspects of violence. He is the author of Holding Your Square: Masculinities, Streetlife and Violence (2006, Willan) and the co-author of Symbolic Gestures and the Generation of Global Social Control: he International Criminal Court (2006, Lexington) and the co-author of Blood, Power and Bedlam: Violations of International Criminal Law in Post-Colonial Africa (2008, Peter Lang). He has also published over 20 articles and books chapters on gender and street crime; genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity and international criminal law and jurisprudence. Dr. Mullins teaches courses in criminological theory, violence and courts. He also serves as the Director of University Studies at SIU.


José Najar

Assistant Professor, History

Jose Najar

José Najar received his Ph.D. from Indiana University-Bloomington in 2012 and became an assistant professor at SIUC in 2014. He is a historian of nineteenth and twentieth-century Brazil and Latin America. His work focuses on topics of whiteness and non-European diasporas in the Americas, gender inequality, imperialism and anti-colonial resistance, and nationalism. Dr. Najar’s first monographic project re-examines the myth of exceptional social mobility, among Syrian-Lebanese immigrants to Brazil, through the analysis of overlapping transnational discourses of white privilege and gender inequality, to rescue Arab women’s participation as active agents in the history of their communities in the diaspora and that of Brazil. His article, “Race, Gender, and Work: Syrian-Lebanese Women in Turn-of-the Century São Paulo” briefly illustrates his overall current work. He is also interested in Third World feminisms, Queer theories, and Critical Race Theory. This range of research and theoretical interests has, and continues to, inform classroom practices and pedagogical approaches to his teaching of history.


Sandra Pensoneau-Conway

Assistant Professor, Communication Studies

Sandra Pensoneau-Conway

Communications Building Room 2246
618-453-1886
sandypc@siu.edu

Dr. Sandra ("Sandy") L. Pensoneau-Conway received her PhD and MS in Speech Communication here at SIUC (now Communication Studies). After being on the faculty at Wayne State University in Detroit for several years, she returned to SIUC where she serves as the Director of the CMST 101 program.  Her teaching and research center largely around the intersections of critical communication pedagogy and identity construction, with a burgeoning interest in disability studies. She has essays published in journals such as Critical EducationCultural Studies <--> Critical Methodologies, and QED: A Journal in LGBTQ Worldmaking, and anthologies such as Handbook of Autoethnography and Discourse of Disability in Higher Education. Outside of her scholarly work and teaching, she is heavily involved with Rainbow Cafe, a southern Illinois LGBT youth center, and the Carbondale New School.


Kathleen Pericak-Spector

Professor, Mathematics

Kathleen Pericak-Spector

618-453-6569
kpericak@math.siu.edu

Research Interests: Hyperbolic PDE's, continuum mechanics, and science education.


Cynthia Sims

Associate Professor, Workforce Education and Development

Cynthia Sims

618-453-3321
csims@siu.edu

Ed.D. Northern Illinois University, 2004.   Adult education and learning; adult program development; workforce diversity, power, and privilege; human resource development; service-learning; diversity in higher education; campus-community partnerships; and mentoring.


Stacey Sloboda

Associate Professor, School of Art and Design

Stacey Sloboda

618-453-4987
sloboda@siu.edu

Stacey Sloboda specializes in eighteenth and nineteenth-century European art.  Along with a primary focus on eighteenth and nineteenth-century British art, her research interests include the history of decorative arts, aesthetic theory, collecting and consumption, and imperial culture. She teaches courses on eighteenth and nineteenth-century visual and material culture at SIU.


Jennifer Smith

Associate Professor, Languages, Cultures and International Trade

Jennifer Smith

618-453-5424
smithjen@siu.edu

Jennifer Smith received her Ph.D. in Hispanic Literature from Indiana University. Her main area of research is late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century Spanish literature and culture, and especially the Galician writer Emilia Pardo Bazán. She is currently working on a book project titled Women, Mysticism, and Hysteria in Fin-de-siècle Spain. In addition to a forthcoming co-edited volume titled Intersections of Race, Class, Gender, and Nation in Fin-de-Siècle Spanish Literature and Culture and a bilingual edition of Emilia Pardo Bazán's Insolación (Cervantes & Co., 2011), Professor Smith has published articles in journals such as Revista Canadiense de Estudios Hispánicos, Revista de Estudios Hispánicos, Anales de la Literatura Española Contemporánea, and Anales Galdosianos. Here at SIU, Dr. Smith teaches undergraduate and graduate courses in Spanish Language, Literature, and Culture.


LaShonda Stewart

Associate Professor, Master of Public Administration (MPA) Program

LaShonda Stewart

Faner 3136

618-453-5695

lms10@siu.edu

Professor Stewart received her Ph.D. from Mississippi State University in May 2008. Her general research area focuses on local governments’ financial management practices, state’s rainy day funds, global budgeting, participatory budgeting, and health information technology. She is, however, most recognized for her research on local governments’ unreserved fund balances with research appearing in Public Budgeting and Finance, Public Finance and Management, Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, and Administration & Society.  In her current research, she seeks to develop a model to explain how local governments accumulate savings. She teaches courses in public administration which includes public budgeting, financial management, and research methods for public administrators. Currently, she serves as Director of the Master of Public Administration (MPA) program.


Angela Upchurch-Wilhelm

Associate Professor, School of Law

Angela Upchurch-Wilhelm

Lesar Law Building, Room 246

618-536-8314

aupchurch@siu.edu

Prior to joining the law faculty at Southern Illinois University School of Law, Professor Angela Upchurch was a Professor of Law and the Associate Dean for Pedagogical Development at Capital University Law School. She also served as the Academic Director of the National Center for Adoption Law and Policy at Capital University Law School from 2007 to 2010.

Her research interests include children and family law, procedural law, and the impact of dispute resolution systems on the interests of children and families. An expert in children and family law, Professor Upchurch participated in the 2008 White House Compassion in Action Roundtable on "Faith and Community Solutions for Orphans and Vulnerable Children" and presented on the Hague Treaty on Intercountry Adoption before the National Conference of State Legislatures. She has taught a variety of children and family law courses, including: Adoption Law; Children, Family and the States; Interdisciplinary Child Welfare Law; and Biotechnology and Reproduction Law.


Rebecca Walker

Assistant Professor, Communication Studies

Rebecca Walker

618-453-1885
r.walker@siu.edu

Rebecca Walker is an Assistant Professor of Communication Studies at Southern Illinois University Carbondale. She received her B.A. from the University of North Texas in Communication Studies with an emphasis in performance studies (1998), an M.A. from the University of North Texas in Communication Studies with an emphasis in performance studies (2004) and her Ph.D. from Louisiana State University in Communication Studies with an emphasis in performance studies (2011). Her primary research interests focus on the intersection(s) of performance, culture, and technology. Specifically, Dr. Walker is interested in how technology influences our culture and communicative practices, particularly our performative practices. Her most recent research in this arena involved a study of flash mobs as performative resistance. Dr. Walker’s other areas of research interest include performance art, rhetoric and popular culture, visual rhetoric, culture jamming, feminist theory, and tourism as communication and performance.


Rachel Whaley

Associate Professor, Sociology

Rachel Whaley

618-453-2494
rwhaley@siu.edu

Dr. Whaley's research and teaching interests are in criminology and the sociology of gender and the intersection of the two subfields. Past research has examined the macro-level correlates of rape and female homicide victimization using data on US cities. Of particular focus is the relationship between structural gender equality and rates of men’s violence against women (and against other men). Current projects examine the relationships between the amount and the nature of change in gender stratification and men’s violence. Dr. Whaley is trained in quantitative research methods and statistical analyses. A new research project examines the portrayal of breastfeeding in major US newspapers.


Chris Wienke

Associate Professor, Sociology

Chris Wienke

618-453-7629

cwienke@siu.edu

Dr. Wienke joined the Sociology department in Fall 2008. His work is primarily in the areas of mental health, family, gender, and sexuality.


Natasha Zaretsky

Associate Professor, History

Natasha Zaretsky

618-453-7876
zaretsky@siu.edu

Dr. Natasha Zaretsky received her Ph.D. in 2003 from the Department of American Civilization at Brown University. Her research interests include U.S. history after 1945, American cultural history, women's and gender history, history of the family, and contemporary theories of race and ethnicity. Her book, No Direction Home: the American Family and the Fear of National Decline, 1968-1980, explores the place of the family in debates about American national decline between 1968 and 1980. It was published in April 2007 by The University of North Carolina Press.