The Charles E. Feinberg Collection of James Joyce 1904-1937 | English

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The Charles E. Feinberg Collection of James Joyce 1904-1937

The Charles E. Feinberg Collection contains about 160 letters and cards, the majority of which are Joyce's correspondence with London literary agent James B. Pinker, who began working with Joyce in 1915. The correspondence with Pinker documents Joyce's efforts to publish a number of his works, including A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and some of his poems. Joyce also writes to Pinker about getting Chamber Music, Exiles, and Dubliners published in the United States. Several series of letters included in the collection concern the publication of Ulysses in the United States. The first, a series of four letters which focuses on proposals to publish the novel in America, includes letters to Joyce from B. W. Huebsch and Lawrence Pollinger, and a letter to Beach from Huebsch. The second series consists of three letters and a telegram between Beach and Pollinger, and includes a letter to Joyce from Pollinger.

Other correspondents in the Feinberg Collection include James Stephens, Frank Budgen, T. Sturge Moore, James Starkey, Nora Joyce, and Paul Leon. In addition, three letters, one from Caresse Crosby to J. W. N. Sullivan, one from Sullivan to Crosby, and one from Joyce to Harry and Caresse Crosby, along with three parts of Tales of Shem and Shaun (published by Black Sun Press), are housed in the Caresse Crosby Collection in the Morris Library. Our extensive Black Sun Press archive has close affinities to James Joyce and his circle.

The Feinberg collection includes a copy of the 1927 International Protest against Samuel Roth's unauthorized publication of sections of Ulysses. Five names, written in pen, have been added to the long typed list of supporters of the protest. In addition, the voting record of the London Stage Society's governing board, which considered and rejected Joyce's Exiles for production in July of 1916, is housed in this collection.